[[ Reading ]] ➶ La figlia dell'aggiustaossa Author Amy Tan – Moi-sosedi.info

La figlia dell'aggiustaossa LuLing E Ruth Sono Madre E Figlia Ruth Cinese Solo Nelle Fattezze, La Sua Professione, La Lingua, Il Modo Di Interpretare La Realt Sono Quelli Di Un Americana Di Oggi LuLing Ha Pi Di Settant Anni Pur Avendo Vissuto Per Mezzo Secolo Negli Stati Uniti, Profondamente Legata Alla Terra D Origine LuLing Vive Sola, Si Mantiene Con Un Povero Sussidio E Comincia A Mostrare I Segni Del Morbo Di Alzheimer Colpita Da Questa Circostanza, Ruth Decide Di Far Tradurre Dal Cinese Un Manoscritto Che, Anni Prima, La Madre Le Aveva Affidato Pregandola Di Leggerlo, Per Avvicinarsi Al Suo Passato Ruth Scopre Che Il Suo Bisnonno Era Un Aggiustaossa E Apprende Segreti Familiari Inimmaginabili This was the first Amy Tan book I read This book wasn t specifically recommended, but the author was I was expecting something magical to happen as I turned the pages, but I couldn t get past the first four or five chapters of the book Besides the overly long sections of actionless description the story stagnated because of a poor balance between backstory, scene setup and description, and actual let s move things along plot , the main character Ruth is so weak and whiny that I couldn t empa This was the first Amy Tan book I read This book wasn t specifically recommended, but the author was I was expecting something magical to happen as I turned the pages, but I couldn t get past the first four or five chapters of the book Besides the overly long sections of actionless description the story stagnated because of a poor balance between backstory, scene setup and description, and actual let s move things along plot , the main character Ruth is so weak and whiny that I couldn t empathize, sympathize or even remotely identify with her she made it impossible to get into the novel It may be unfair to give The Bonesetter s Daughter a poor review without reading the whole thing, but I wonder how anyone could stay with this character for any length of time I did like the character of LuLing, even if the stilted, stereotypical dialog coming from her seemed unecessary at best and amateurish at worst LuLing, Ruth s aging and Alzheimer stricken mother, is a strong character and the only thing that kept me in the novel as long as I was Bottom line the protagonist was forgettable and the pace was too slow Even January molasses memoirs get somewhere, but this book just ended up back at the library well ahead of its due date Amy Tan s books are like a fine wine they re meant to be savored, to get the maximum amount of enjoyment out of each drop or word on each page.I have yet to read a book that s worthy of anything less than 5 stars Knock on wood, let s hope it stays that way.Ruth is a 46 year old professional woman with a busy life of her own she has a successful but demanding career, a live in boyfriend with whom she has a complicated relationship, 2 step kids who are bratty imho for most of the book, and Amy Tan s books are like a fine wine they re meant to be savored, to get the maximum amount of enjoyment out of each drop or word on each page.I have yet to read a book that s worthy of anything less than 5 stars Knock on wood, let s hope it stays that way.Ruth is a 46 year old professional woman with a busy life of her own she has a successful but demanding career, a live in boyfriend with whom she has a complicated relationship, 2 step kids who are bratty imho for most of the book, and finally, an elderly mother who may have some serious health issues to face.Her mother LuLing has one foot planted firmly in her past her roots are in China, and she has spent a lifetime coming to terms with what happened there before she moved to the United States after WWII.There are things she has revealed to her daughter, but only in Chinese Ruth is forced to come to terms with herself, her boyfriend and her mother.This book is broken into 3 parts, with the middle part going into LuLing s history in war torn China The fluidity of Tan s writing is so superb, and her ability to weave a tale that s written so perfectly is simply wonderful Tan is a master at writing about history she offers richly vivid depictions , complicated issues, multi generational conflicts, redemption, forgiveness and self awareness I can t say enough good things about this book My only regret is that I didn t read it sooner This is a chronicle of voicelessness across three generations of a Chinese family it captures how these women lost their voices, why they continued to be voiceless, and how they attempted to reclaim their voice Voice in this book is both literal and figurative it s about standing up for oneself, speaking one s truth, being acknowledged, being understood, and not being censored And the perpetrators who claim the women s voices can be cultural, personal through the violation of one s secrets This is a chronicle of voicelessness across three generations of a Chinese family it captures how these women lost their voices, why they continued to be voiceless, and how they attempted to reclaim their voice Voice in this book is both literal and figurative it s about standing up for oneself, speaking one s truth, being acknowledged, being understood, and not being censored And the perpetrators who claim the women s voices can be cultural, personal through the violation of one s secrets or body , cross cultural, as what happens to the youngest when she finds herself in a relationship with a man who already has two Caucasian children, and even professional, as what happens for those who choose to give voice to others ideas but not their own as ghostwriters And not incidentally, it is also a book about ghosts who remain with us from our past, haunting us with their curses or benevolently giving us advice about our current choices Serendipitously enough, this book made me proud to be part Chinese, but also sad that there was so much about Chinese culture and especially its writing and its calligraphy that I cannot understand But in the end, it inspires the reader to speak out, to express appreciation to relatives, to insist on being heard in one s relationship, and to rediscover the paths of their ancestors It may sound corny, but this book was an incredibly moving read for me, unsettling me and making me question my own experiences at itsdifficult passages On a general note, however, please stop titling book s The Blank s Daughter From the abortionist to the gravedigger to the bonesetter, I m tired of women being defined by the occupation of their father What shall I title my memoir The Senior Health care Analyst s Daughter Hmm Regardless, after Joy Luck Club, this is definitely Tan s most powerful novel Bravo Some passages that struck a chord There s a lovely discussion on someone s favorite word, vapors, a passage too long for me to quote, but very thoughtfully done pgs 20 21 A lot of her mother s admonitions had to do with not showing what you really felt about all sorts of things hope disappointment , and especially love The less you showed, theyou meant p 92 Or in my own mother s case, the less you showed, theyou were in control of your feelings, your effect on others, and the situation involved a misguided philosophy I took years to unlearn, though I know it s hopeless to convince my mom of the error of her affective formula You can have pride in what you do each day,ut not arrogance in what you were born with p 250.And lastly, It broke her heart to see her mother trying so hard, being so conscientious, do determine to be valuable Making her mother happy would have been easy all along LuLing simply wanted to be essential, as a mother should be p 301 Like The Joy Luck Club, this book is about relationships between mothers and daughters, and the importance of knowing each other s life stories In the first part of the book, we meet Ruth, a first generation Chinese American working as a ghostwriter for New Age self help books in California She has a hard time asserting herself in her ten year relationship with her boyfriend Her mother, LuLing, has been recently diagnosed with dementia, and can no longer live alone LuLing is depressed, criti Like The Joy Luck Club, this book is about relationships between mothers and daughters, and the importance of knowing each other s life stories In the first part of the book, we meet Ruth, a first generation Chinese American working as a ghostwriter for New Age self help books in California She has a hard time asserting herself in her ten year relationship with her boyfriend Her mother, LuLing, has been recently diagnosed with dementia, and can no longer live alone LuLing is depressed, critical, sends her daughter on guilt trips, and threatens to commit suicide whenever she is crossed She believes in superstitions and curses, and needs to communicate with the dead when she makes important decisions.The second part of the book tells the story of LuLing and the bonesetter s daughter back in China This memoir written by LuLing, was my favorite part of the book LuLing was part of a rural family that made high quality ink that was used in calligraphy Both LuLing and her mother faced difficult challenges, and were never totally accepted by her father s family In her teens, LuLing was taken in by missionaries during the Japanese occupation of China, and she later immigrated to the United States LuLing s journal gives Ruth the knowledge to understand her mother better, and to make sense of Ruth s childhood.The third part of the book is set in the present, and easy solutions are found for both LuLing s and Ruth s problems A thread seems to tie the three generations of women together in strong, but difficult, mother daughter relationships.I had mixed feelings about this book The first part of the book, about Ruth s problems and LuLing s negative parenting, dragged for me The second part, set in China, was exciting with wonderful characters the bonesetter grandfather, the wicked relatives, LuLing s first love, the suicidal nursemaid The short third part brought things together well, but seemed to promise an almost too rosy future I enjoyed this very much in fact and I was surprised because it s not my usual fare I don t go for Bestsellers Tan splits the story into three sections told by mother and daughter in first person, which works well Ruth is second generation Chinese American, and her story comes first, set in 2009 She tells us about her very difficult relationship with her aging mother, Luling The second part set in Immortal Heart village, rural north China is Luling s story of her growing up, and t I enjoyed this very much in fact and I was surprised because it s not my usual fare I don t go for Bestsellers Tan splits the story into three sections told by mother and daughter in first person, which works well Ruth is second generation Chinese American, and her story comes first, set in 2009 She tells us about her very difficult relationship with her aging mother, Luling The second part set in Immortal Heart village, rural north China is Luling s story of her growing up, and the traumatic story of her mother, Precious Auntie The name of Ruth s grandmother is finally recovered in the last part of the story Gu Xian Lin which I think is meant to symbolize the possibility of recovery of being able to re write a positive present even from terrible injustices in the past The final part returns us to San Francisco, in the present day.I have to say I LOVED the fraught relationships between mothers and daughters in both of the main sections In fact I wanted to run to Amy Tan and say someone finally speaking the truth about the difficult relationship most women have with their mothers and possibly vice versa I can t comment here because I only have a son Anyway what I wanted to say to Tan is YES the truth at last we love and hate them in equal measure, which we find confusing and disturbing A note on the narrative style Tan focuses on the story there is no fancy writing it is plain this is what is happening this is what happened true, fast paced narrative style But be careful reader there is plenty of irony and nuance in this plain style.Allow me to reproduce a neat little scene where Luling and the other orphan children are requested to paint over the Buddhist and Tao statues at the request of the Christian sisters from America who run the school orphanage One day, before Christmas, when it was too cold to go anywhere, Miss Grutoff decided that we should convert the Chinese gods into Christians We would baptize them with paintsome of the students who had come later did not want to deface the gods and tempt their wrath They were so scared that when they were dragged to the statues they screamed and foamed at the mouth, then fell to the ground as if possessed I was not afraid I believed that if I was respectful to both the Chinese gods and the Christian one, neither would harm me The Chinese gods understood that we were living in a Western household run by Americans If the gods could speak, they too, would insist that the Christian deities have the better position As my brush ran over their gold and red faces, I said, Pardon me, Jade Ruler, forgive me, Chief of the Eight Mortals, I am only making a disguise for you, in case the Communists or the Japanese come and recruit statues for a bonfire I particularly liked Tan s clear and accurate explanations of how Chinese words are built from several characters each with a different meaning, and together they form a new word which has a specific meaning, but also includes overtones of other possible meanings Our main character Luling is an expert calligrapher so we get to hear plenty of interesting details about this ancient art which I found delightful In fact one of the very great pleasures of this book was to have so many aspects of Chinese art and culture integrated so elegantly into the narrative.My only reservation and hence the four stars is that the pacing does become a little hectic There were several points where I wanted the story to slow so that I could hearabout for example the other orphans orabout physical details of the village, orabout Hong Kong as WWII ended The last section and I think one other reviewer commented was a little too neat, with perhaps one too many happy endings I suspect there is a sort of symbolism in that all parties have grown in the course of the story so I could understand this search for happiness Overall Tan achieved incredible balance with all the different elements that she wanted to relate for example, the horrors of war the difficult process of integrating into a foreign culture the effect of being disconnected from your family and traditions the trauma of disinheritance An incredibly powerful read 4 4.5 stars.Tan portrayed in a great way the cultural and language conflicts between migrant parents and their kids.I also enjoyed the part of the book set in China from 1915 to 1950. I just didn t enjoy this as much as Amy Tan s other books Her plot development, with its mother daughter issues, has become almost a formula She does do a credible job describing life in China in the last century and I came away with a deeper understanding of that culture I just never thought of Amy Tan as the Maeve Binchy of Asian writing This is not meant to be a criticism of Maeve Binchy, an author whose well written books I think are fun to read It just is I get the impression that she I just didn t enjoy this as much as Amy Tan s other books Her plot development, with its mother daughter issues, has become almost a formula She does do a credible job describing life in China in the last century and I came away with a deeper understanding of that culture I just never thought of Amy Tan as the Maeve Binchy of Asian writing This is not meant to be a criticism of Maeve Binchy, an author whose well written books I think are fun to read It just is I get the impression that she keeps writing the same story, just changing the locations a little and adding nuances to the characters That is how I am beginning to feel about Amy Tan Amy Tan has a way of starting a story that s impossible to put down For the first half of the book I kept wondering what about it made it so good Anecdotal stories, relatable characters, Chinese folklore for interest these are all good, but I finally realized in the last quarter of the book why I liked it so much Because it s a book about learning to love your past no matter how many scars it gives you, and learning to love and forgive your parents and ancestors, no matter what they may h Amy Tan has a way of starting a story that s impossible to put down For the first half of the book I kept wondering what about it made it so good Anecdotal stories, relatable characters, Chinese folklore for interest these are all good, but I finally realized in the last quarter of the book why I liked it so much Because it s a book about learning to love your past no matter how many scars it gives you, and learning to love and forgive your parents and ancestors, no matter what they may have done to your gene pool It s a story about loving people the best way you know how, and believing that some day they ll know just how much you love them, and just how much you wish you could change your faults so you could love them better But you hope that your feeble offering will be enough And it s a story about accepting the feeble offering for the gold mine that it is not feeble at all I learned a lot about myself and my family relationships through reading this book, and would recommend it to anyone who has a loved one they just can t quite relate to or understand I almost gave up on this book early on I m glad I didn t While I didn t really care for the character of Ruth too much or her life in San Fransisco, the story of her mother LuLing really saved the book and turned the entire novel into a deeply affecting work The middle act where LuLing is allowed to tell her story in her own words was the obvious high point of the book for me.


About the Author: Amy Tan

Amy Tan Chinese pinyin T n nm i born February 19, 1952 is an American writer whose works explore mother daughter relationships and what it means to grow up as a first generation Asian American In 1993, Tan s adaptation of her most popular fiction work, The Joy Luck Club, became a commercially successful film.She has written several other books, including The Kitchen God s Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, and The Bonesetter s Daughter, and a collection of non fiction essays entitled The Opposite of Fate A Book of Musings Her most recent book, Saving Fish From Drowning, explores the tribulations experienced by a group of people who disappear while on an art expedition into the jungles of Burma In addition, Tan has written two children s books The Moon Lady 1992 and Sagwa, The Chinese Siamese Cat 1994 , which was turned into an animated series airing on PBS She has also appeared on PBS in a short spot on encouraging children to write.Currently, she is the literary editor for West, Los Angeles Times Sunday magazine.


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